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How to Fall Asleep Fast When the Fluffy Pillow and Cozy Blankets Don't Help

How to Fall Asleep Fast When the Fluffy Pillow and Cozy Blankets Don't Help
From Lifehack - November 10, 2017

Winter is coming, and for many of us, that means bundling up in cozy blankets and pilling fluffy pillows on our bed to tempt us to hit the snooze button more than usual. Though turning up the heat before you turn into bed can seem appealing with cooler weather, you may find you dont have such a restful night of sleep.Winter is coming, and for many of us, that means bundling up in cozy blankets and pilling fluffy pillows on our bed to tempt us to hit the snooze button more than usual. Though turning up the heat before you turn into bed can seem appealing with cooler weather, you may find you dont have such a restful night of sleep.

Though it sounds like a cozy bedroom creation, keeping your bedroom warm can make you more likely to overheat while you sleep. This can lead to excessive tossing and turning and even those embarrassing sweaty mornings.

The relationship between body temperature and sleep

Our body temperature is always changing and self-adjusting throughout the day.

As you can see from the graph above, youre coolest around 6amthe time many of us wake up. Throughout the day, you continue to get warmer until you peak around 9pmthe time many of us are getting ready to head to bed. From there, your body temperature drops until you reach your coolest point once again at 6am.

Have you ever realized how lazy you feel when youre hot? Its due to a physiological response our body gives off!

Its fighting against the temperature in an effort to keep from overheating. Its the same reason youre more likely to want to take a nap on a hot summer afternoon than you would be to play a sport. One will help regulate your body temp, while the other can overheat you and cause severe dizziness.

By now youve heard about how important absolute darkness is for truly restful sleep, but did you know your body temperature is just as impactful?1

Combination of sleep onset and maintenance insomnia has been associated with a 24-h elevation of core body temperature supporting the chronic hyper-arousal model of insomnia. The possibility that these last two types of insomnia may be related to impaired thermoregulation, particularly a reduced ability to dissipate body heat from distal skin areas, has not been consistently supported in laboratory studies. Further studies of thermoregulation are needed in the typical home environment in which the insomnia is most evident.

The best temperature for restful sleep

The optimal body temperature for sleep should be between 60 and 67 degrees.2When the room is too warm and youre also bundled under a heavy comforter and surrounded by heavy pillows, the body temperature increases leading to discomfort.

In most cases any temperature above 75 degrees Fahrenheit and below 54 degrees will interfere with your sleep.

Keep your body temperature low to sleep better

Get some sleep!

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